Video featuring two children explaining ‘how to kill your teacher’ sparks B.C. school board investigation

( | January 21, 2015)

 

An online video featuring two children offering crude instructions on “how to kill your teacher” is under investigation by the Nanaimo-Ladysmith school district.

 

The video, posted on YouTube approximately a week ago, features two young boys displaying what appear to be toy guns and discussing how to kill a teacher.

 

Nanaimo RCMP, who estimate the boys to be 11 or 12 years old, were alerted to the video’s existence after it was noticed by a radio host in Florida.

 

The video, which has since been removed, was forwarded to all senior administrators in the school district in an attempt to identify the students.

 

But Nanaimo Mounties will not get involved unless it is determined that the boys are from the city, said Nanaimo RCMP spokesman Const. Gary O’Brien.

 

“The main thing is that we want to identify who the kids are and sit down with them, with their parents, to discuss the total inappropriateness of the video.” said O’Brien.

 

The main thing is that we want to identify who the kids are and sit down with them, with their parents, to discuss the total inappropriateness of the video

 

Radio host Shawn Wasson stumbled across the video during research for his show The News Junkie out of Orlando, Fla.

 

Concerned, Wasson dug deeper and found another video posted by the same user that featured a Nanaimo landmark.

 

The primary issue was safety, said Wasson.

 

“I thought if there was a teacher in the school district where these kids [might be] going, they would probably want to be aware of that, and at least have some sort of talk with these kids,” said Wasson.

 

“Kids need to know that when you post something like this online, whether you think it’s a joke or you’re living in a fantasy world, it can be taken differently by someone who may feel that they’re a target of what you’re saying.”

 

He said although less common in Canada, U.S. citizens are all too aware of the consequences of inaction when it comes to crimes like school shootings.

 

“This is a new reality. Some of this may have been going on before MySpace or YouTube or Facebook or any of those things popped up, and now . . . posting things like this that can get them in some pretty serious trouble,” said Wasson.

 

The school district does not currently have a social media policy in place but are working on one as part of their communications plan, said spokesman Dale Burgos.

 

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